Turkey seems to be on everybody’s destination list. But, Alacati has been missed by most, if not all. And, we wonder how and why, considering Alaçati is one of the most authentic towns in Turkey with stone houses, narrow streets, boutique hotels and restaurants with tables on the streets.

Alaçati lies on the western coast of İzmir Province in Turkey, which has been famous for its architecture, vineyards and windmills for over 150 years. And, its crystal clear water, consistent and steady wind have made it well-known in the windsurfing and kitesurfing world. The recent addition of galleries, beach clubs and the slow-food scene have now made Alaçati summertime’s coolest spot in Turkey.

Carry a good pair of walking shoes when you visit Alaçatı because it is best explored on foot. Down the side streets, where sleeping dogs lie, with numerous dark little antique shops where you can pick up a framed sampler with ancient texts or a pretty wooden box, or some colourful porcelain doorknobs.

For foodies Barbun is a must visit for its elegantly prepared seafood, as well as seasonal risottos and modern takes on classic regional dishes.
Or, try Alancha that professes to use ancient Anatolian methods and modern cooking techniques to create what the eatery calls “True and Honest Food”. Sit at the Chef’s Table inside the main kitcher and chat and see the chefs in action while you enjoy their tasting menus.

Spend your nights in sumptuous palace that Sultan Suleiman completed in 1528, complete with Turkish bath, Jacuzzi with sea views, and four hundred years of tumultuous history. Located in nearby Cesme, Alaçati’s bigger, livelier neighbour, the Ottoman charms of Kanui Kervansaray are to be truly experienced
Turkey’s wine is making a comeback and one of the centres where this is happening is Urla, only 50km away from Alaçati. A day trip is the perfect way to acquaint yourself to Urla wines that were first made here over a thousand years ago. You could even stay at one of the wineries to get a close view into what makes Urla wines the toast of Turkish wines.
Another day trip that’s worth doing is a 90-minute one to Ephesus, an ancient Greek city founded in 10th century BC and abandoned in 15th century AD. The city flourished after it came under the control of the Roman Republic in 129 BC but contains the largest collection of Roman ruins in the eastern Mediterranean today.

If you get yourself a Greek visa before you travel to Alaçati you can hop across from the Cesme marina to the beautiful Greek island of Chios. Otherwise, remain in Turkey and content yourself with a boat cruise around the Cesme peninsula which is quite picturesque on its own.
So, do make it Alaçati when you’re in Turkey next for which all you need to do so is call Lighthouse on (0) 9818905024 or email theworld@golighthouse.in.in.

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